rainy day adventures

We were planning on going to do bird watching, but because of the rain we decided to do something else. We ended up going to a Hindu temple called Temple in the Sea. The original temple was built by Sewdass Sadhu. He was a poor, indentured laborer from India and tried to create a place of worship in colonial Trinidad. He built a beautiful temple only using a bicycle. There was few temples in Trinidad at the time and when the management of the sugar company that owned all the land in the area noticed it on their land. Sewdass Sadhu was fined and arrested and the temple was destroyed. After all that, he still wanted a peaceful place of worship. For over a year and using only a bicycle, he built another temple in the sea, so it wouldn't be on owned land. It has since been restored, but it is still beautiful with an amazing history. When we were there, we briefly attended the Sunday service. It was amazing to hear their chants and to be welcomed into the service by having tikas (a red powder) placed on our foreheads. It was such an interesting and special experience.

After that, we visited the Indian Caribbean Museum of Trinidad and Tobago. They had a large collection of artifacts and photographs of the Indo-Caribbeans. Our bus driver, Sam, grew up with many of the items in the museum and showed us what they were and how his family used them. It was really great to learn about the items from someone who has used them. On the way to lunch, we quickly stopped at the Hanuman Temple, which is the largest outside of India.

Once we finished lunch, we drove to the La Brea Pitch Lake. It was very different than the one in California. We were able to walk out on the pitch and touch the soft asphalt. It was cool to interact with the area. While we were walking to the lake, we stopped and ate cashew fruit right off the fruit. I had never seen how cashews grow before. There were very juicy, but they dried out our mouths when we ate them. Our guide told us that a lot of the roads around the world are made from the asphalt from this pitch. He told us that the lake replenishes itself every 7 days. When we asked about how long the lake will last, he said that if they continue to mine the lake at their current rate, the pitch will last another 400 years.
 
 
 
It was a busy day, but we learned a lot more about the culture and environment in Trinidad. 
 
today's menu
-watermelon, then pancakes with bacon (served at the house)
-Island Spice pizza from Papa John's (my share was $40TT)
-cashew fruit (off the tree at the pitch lake)
-barbeque chicken with veggies, lentils, and rice (served at the house)
 
For more information on Sewdass Sadhu, check out this article.

2 thoughts on “rainy day adventures

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rainy day adventures

We were planning on going to do bird watching, but because of the rain we decided to do something else. We ended up going to a Hindu temple called Temple in the Sea. The original temple was built by Sewdass Sadhu. He was a poor, indentured laborer from India and tried to create a place of worship in colonial Trinidad. He built a beautiful temple only using a bicycle. There was few temples in Trinidad at the time and when the management of the sugar company that owned all the land in the area noticed it on their land. Sewdass Sadhu was fined and arrested and the temple was destroyed. After all that, he still wanted a peaceful place of worship. For over a year and using only a bicycle, he built another temple in the sea, so it wouldn't be on owned land. It has since been restored, but it is still beautiful with an amazing history. When we were there, we briefly attended the Sunday service. It was amazing to hear their chants and to be welcomed into the service by having tikas (a red powder) placed on our foreheads. It was such an interesting and special experience.

After that, we visited the Indian Caribbean Museum of Trinidad and Tobago. They had a large collection of artifacts and photographs of the Indo-Caribbeans. Our bus driver, Sam, grew up with many of the items in the museum and showed us what they were and how his family used them. It was really great to learn about the items from someone who has used them. On the way to lunch, we quickly stopped at the Hanuman Temple, which is the largest outside of India.

Once we finished lunch, we drove to the La Brea Pitch Lake. It was very different than the one in California. We were able to walk out on the pitch and touch the soft asphalt. It was cool to interact with the area. While we were walking to the lake, we stopped and ate cashew fruit right off the fruit. I had never seen how cashews grow before. There were very juicy, but they dried out our mouths when we ate them. Our guide told us that a lot of the roads around the world are made from the asphalt from this pitch. He told us that the lake replenishes itself every 7 days. When we asked about how long the lake will last, he said that if they continue to mine the lake at their current rate, the pitch will last another 400 years.
 
 
 
It was a busy day, but we learned a lot more about the culture and environment in Trinidad. 
 
today's menu
-watermelon, then pancakes with bacon (served at the house)
-Island Spice pizza from Papa John's (my share was $40TT)
-cashew fruit (off the tree at the pitch lake)
-barbeque chicken with veggies, lentils, and rice (served at the house)
 
For more information on Sewdass Sadhu, check out this article.

2 thoughts on “rainy day adventures

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